Tag: mainline Protestantism

Visit a Ragamuffin Church

Visit a Ragamuffin Church

The following was written last summer. I was reflecting on the recent purchase of a car and how people tend to look at finding a new church in the same way. I also made an ask that people looking for a new church community look for a “dead” church where they can be of service instead of finding a church that fits their needs. Of course, I say this as the pastor of a ragamuffin, “dead” church. I hope it is of help.

Keep reading at my Medium page…

 
Finding God in the Drive-Thru Lane

Finding God in the Drive-Thru Lane

What is God up to?

I’ve been hearing that phrase over and over lately.  It’s the focus on a book I’m reading, the Crucifixion of Ministry by Andrew Purves.  It’s the sense that instead of engaging in the business of ministry as if it’s all up to us, Purves wants pastors to step back and let go.  God is the one that saves and redeems and it isn’t us.

I will admit, that frustrates me.  You are taught all these skills in seminary and the culture around us tells us very plainly that if we aren’t doing something that can bring in more people to come to worship, then it’s all our fault.  

I’ve been at my congregation now for seven years and in those years we haven’t really grown much over that time.  It’s hard for me to not wonder if I’m doing something wrong.  Am I praying enough.  How about reading the Bible.  I need to start a Faith on Tap!  

But wondering what God is both intriguing and maddening. It’s intriguing because finding out what God is up to means trying to be attentive to what God is doing in our world and especially in our neighborhood.  What have we missed by being so involved in busy work?

But looking for God is also scary, because it feels like quietism- meaning just end up doing nothing and waiting for God to do something.

Maybe that’s not what it means.  Maybe it means living our lives and observing how God worked in our lives and the lives of others. 

This past week, I was in a drive-thru lane waiting to get my food.  I come up to the window ready to pay for my meal when I find out that someone, probably the person that was ahead of me, paid for my meal.  It was fascinating that this happened to me once, but it happened TWICE.  Two times I was in a drive-thru lane and twice someone paid my bill.

I do wonder if I should have done a good deed and paid it forward for the person behind me.  I didn’t and I wonder if should have. What was God up to in those moments? What does it mean for my life or for the ministry I’m involved in.

Elizabeth Eaton, the Presiding Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, wrote in early 2019 about the church is worried about our church.  Churches are shrinking, budgets are tightening, people are leaving.  We want to know what we can do and we spend time at conferences wondering what we can do to help our congregation grow. 

But Eaton thinks we are asking the wrong question.  We should be asking what God is up to. She quotes from Isaiah 43 about God doing a new thing and are we open to seeing it. Can we see that new thing happening or are we trying to recreate a past? Eaton writes: 

If we want to attract people to our congregations to rebuild a memory, God will not bless our efforts. But if we—grabbed by the Spirit in baptism, changed by the word, intimately and lovingly connected to Jesus and each other in communion, and set free by grace to serve the neighbor—invite all people into true life, then we shall become part of the answer.

This takes attention and devotion. Worship, prayer, Scripture study, generosity and service—not in order to save the church, but in response to the new life God has given us in Christ.

What we are being called to do is basically to live our lives faithfully.  Go to worship. Pray daily.  Serve others.  As she says, we don’t do this to save the church and we shouldn’t be spending time “saving the church.”  What we are called to do is live a life of thankfulness to the new things God is doing.

I still don’t know what that paying forward meant, but maybe it’s reminding me to be thankful to God’s work in the world.  

I pray that I not tie myself in knots in trying to “save the church.” I can’t save this congregation because it was never mine to save.  But I do want to take the time to live out my ministry and see God working in the world.  Who knows? It might lead to a renewal of my church and maybe your church as well.   

The New Orthodoxy and Me

rainbowcrossFor the last few years, I’ve been impressed with a growing number of writers and bloggers, mostly from Methodist circles, but from some other traditions as well who seem to be carrying the Neo-Orthodox/Post-Liberal banner that had seem somewhat dormant for a while. I’ve been attracted to this stream of Protestantism after finding both evangelicalism and liberal Protestantism wanting in different ways.  Writers like Allan Bevere, David Watson, the boys over at Via United Methodists and others echo some of the same feelings I’ve been thinking about God, Jesus and the church.  They show a different way of being within mainline Protestantism.  It is more focused on the importance of salvation, atonement, sin and grace which sadly has become a counter-movement against the spiritually relative ethos in the mainline (at least among the elite).

But while I am thankful for this small movement, I am also left with some wariness about this movement when it comes to the issue of sexuality.  Is there room for LGBT people in this movement?

I’m probably an odd duck: a gay Christian that has an orthodox theology. That’s not how it usually goes: most churches that tend to be gay-friendly, also tend to be quite progressive in their theology.  Many gays would tend to have a more liberal theology.  (Small-o orthodox doesn’t mean conservative.) But I’ve never felt comfortable with the standard liberal theology.  Post-liberal theology is a far better fit for me. ( I know that I’m not the only gay person that doesn’t fit the usual profile.)

But a good part of these writers haven’t said much about sexuality.  Some writers, like the late William Placher, were gay friendly.  But what about other bloggers?  I understand there is still disagreement on this issue and I’m not asking that this movement start excluding those who have different views on sexuality.  But I am wondering if there is room for me.  So, how does sexuality fit in this neo-orthodox/ post-liberal milieu?

I’m looking forward to your answers.